Steamed Mussels with Corn and Tomatoes - Chorros a la Chalaca

TOTAL TIME: 30 min
Prep: 20 min
Inactive Prep: --
Cook: 10 min
YIELD: 6 servings
LEVEL: Easy

ingredients

  • 2 ears corn, husked
  • 2 pounds mussels (see Note)
  • 1/2 cup water
  • 1 large tomato (about 8 ounces), cored, seeded, and cut into small dice (about 1 1/2 cups)
  • 1 small red onion, cut into tiny dice (about 1/2 cup)
  • 1/2 yellow bell pepper, cored, seeded and cut into small dice (about 1/2 cup)
  • 1/4 cup chopped cilantro leaves
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 2 large cloves garlic, minced
  • 1/2 serrano pepper, minced
  • 1 lime, juiced
  • Kosher or fine sea salt and freshly ground black pepper
    • recipe tools

      Directions

      Remove as much of the corn silk as possible. Trim off the stalk ends from the cob. Stand the ears up on a cutting board and, using a short sharp knife, shave off the kernels. Get as much of the kernels as possible without cutting into the cob and be careful, the kernels have a tendency to fly all over the kitchen.

      Put the corn kernels, mussels, and 1/2 cup water in a wide deep skillet or Dutch oven. Cover and bring to a boil over medium-high heat. Steam, shaking the pan occasionally, just until the mussels open up, 3 to 5 minutes.

      While the mussels are steaming, toss the tomato, red onion, yellow pepper, cilantro, olive oil, garlic, chile, and lime juice together in a bowl. Season with salt and pepper, to taste.

      When the mussels are open, scoop them out with a skimmer and put them in a serving bowl large enough to hold them comfortably. Add the tomato mixture to the mussel steaming liquid, give it a quick stir and pour everything in the pan over the mussels. Serve hot, warm or at room temperature.

      Note: Most mussels found in markets today are 'cultivated' meaning that they are raised in a controlled environment and are much less likely to be muddy or to sport "beards," the wiry growths that protrude from the shell. If the mussels you buy have beards-you'll find them sticking out from between the shells about halfway down the flat side of the mussel-simply give the beards a good, firm tug to remove them. In any case, it's a good idea to rinse the mussels in a colander under cold water before cooking them.

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