In preserving, as with most things, it's all about the right tool for the job. To the untrained eye, one Mason jar may look more or less like another, and while it's true they all get the job done, each has its strengths. There are two jars that have particular use: the Ball 12-oz. quilted jars and 24-oz. pint-and-a-half jars. Each of these is larger than their standard counterparts (half pint and pint, respectively), and each has a straight, cylindrical profile. This, then, makes them perfect for canning long, narrow things, like asparagus -- and green beans. They're an excellent project for the newbie preserver. It's as simple as packing the product into the jar, bringing a vinegar brine to a boil, and pouring same brine into the jar. They can be processed if you want them to be shelf-stable, but even if you just refrigerate them they'll keep for weeks. As if they'll last that long.
Recipe courtesy of Sean Timberlake
Dilly Pickled Beans
Total:
1 hr 5 min
Active:
20 min
Yield:
About 6 servings
Level:
Intermediate
Total:
1 hr 5 min
Active:
20 min
Yield:
About 6 servings
Level:
Intermediate

Ingredients

  • 1 pound green beans
  • 2 cloves garlic, peeled
  • 1 tablespoon red pepper flakes, or 1 serrano pepper, sliced
  • 3 teaspoons dill seed, or several sprigs fresh dill weed
  • 1 cup white vinegar
  • 1/2 cup white wine vinegar
  • 1/2 cup water
  • 3 tablespoons pickling or canning salt

Directions

Wash the green beans and trim their ends so that they are uniform. If needed, cut them further so that they will fit easily inside of the jars you are using to can them.

Divide the beans into sterilized canning jars, along with the garlic, pepper flakes and dill seed. In a small saucepan, bring the vinegars, water and pickling salt to a boil, until the salt dissolves.

Pour the pickling mixture over the green beans and cap the jars.

Process the jars in a boiling water bath for 10 minutes. Alternatively, allow to cool and refrigerate.

Properly-handled sterilized equipment will keep canned foods in good condition for years. Sterilizing jars is the first step of preserving foods.

Cook's Note

When you fill your jars, really pack these beans in. Even if you think you can't cram one more in, try it; you'll be surprised how many you can fit in, and it will help them keep from floating in the jar. Also, be sure not to use iodized salt, like table salt. It will discolor your pickles over time. Jars should be made from glass and free of any chips or cracks. Preserving or canning jars are topped with a glass, plastic, or metal lid, which has a rubber seal. Two piece lids are best for canning, as they vacuum seal when processed.

Properly handled sterilized equipment will keep canned foods in good condition for one year. Making sure hands, equipment and surfaces in your canning area are clean is the first step in canning. Tips: Jars should be made from glass and free of any chips or cracks. Preserving or canning jars are topped with glass, plastic or metal lids that have a rubberlike seal. Two-piece metal lids are most common. To prepare jars before filling: Wash jars with hot, soapy water, rinse them well and arrange them open-side up, without touching, on a tray. To sterilize jars, boil them in a large saucepan, covered with water, for 10 minutes. Jars have to be sterilized only if the food to be preserved will be processed for less than 10 minutes in a boiling-water bath or pressure canner. To sterilize jars, boil them in a large saucepan, covered with water, for 10 minutes. Follow manufacturer's instructions for cleaning and preparing lids and bands. Use tongs or jar lifters to remove hot sterilized jars from the boiling water. Be sure the tongs are sterilized too: Dip the tong ends in boiling water for a few minutes before using them. All items used in the process of making jams, jellies, preserves and pickles must be clean, including any towels and especially your hands. After the jars are prepared, you can preserve the food. It is important to follow any canning and processing instructions included in the recipe and refer to USDA guidelines about the sterilization of canned products. Find Information information on canning can be found at the National Center for Home Food Preservation website: http://nchfp.uga.edu/.

More from:

Kitchen Adventures

IDEAS YOU'LL LOVE

Throwdown Cuban Sandwich with Homemade Pickles

Recipe courtesy of Bobby Flay

Skillet Bean Hash

Recipe courtesy of Melissa Gaman

Turkey Sausages with Spicy Beans : Sausages with Fagioli All'uccelletta

Recipe courtesy of Gabriele Corcos|Debi Mazar

Lamb Belly with Peas, Fava Beans and Cashew-Date Romesco

Cooking Tips

How to Poach Eggs Perfectly

Watch videos from Cooking Channel shows and chefs. Learn to prepare feature recipes and relive your favorite moments

On TV

Kelsey's Homemade

7:30am | 6:30c

Kelsey's Homemade

8:30am | 7:30c

Kelsey's Homemade

9:30am | 8:30c

Good Eats

10am | 9c

Good Eats

10:30am | 9:30c

Good Eats

11am | 10c

Good Eats

11:30am | 10:30c

Man Fire Food

12pm | 11c

Man Fire Food

12:30pm | 11:30c

Man Fire Food

1pm | 12c

Man Fire Food

1:30pm | 12:30c

Emeril's Florida

2:30pm | 1:30c

Unique Sweets

3:30pm | 2:30c

Unique Sweets

4:30pm | 3:30c

Sugar Showdown

5:30pm | 4:30c

Sugar Showdown

6:30pm | 5:30c

Sugar Showdown

7:30pm | 6:30c
On Tonight
On Tonight

Sugar Showdown

8pm | 7c

Sugar Showdown

8:30pm | 7:30c

Donut Showdown

9:30pm | 8:30c

Cupcake Showdown

10:30pm | 9:30c

Good Eats

11pm | 10c

Good Eats

11:30pm | 10:30c

Sugar Showdown

12am | 11c

Sugar Showdown

12:30am | 11:30c

Donut Showdown

1:30am | 12:30c

Cupcake Showdown

2:30am | 1:30c

Good Eats

3am | 2c

Good Eats

3:30am | 2:30c

So Much Pretty Food Here