Red Pepper Jelly

Pair this with pork or serve with cornbread or cream cheese and crackers.

TOTAL TIME: 50 min
Prep: 10 min
Inactive Prep: 20 min
Cook: 20 min
 
YIELD: 3 cups
LEVEL: Intermediate

ingredients

  • 5 cherry bomb peppers or Fresno chiles, stemmed and chopped with stems removed
  • 2 large red bell peppers, stemmed, seeded and chopped
  • 3 cups sugar
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Directions

Place the peppers in a food processor and process until completely broken down. Transfer to a cheesecloth or clean towel and squeeze tightly to remove any excess liquid.

Add the sugar, vinegar and peppers to a heavy-bottomed saucepan over medium-high heat and bring to a rolling boil, 4 to 6 minutes. Attach a deep-fry thermometer, whisk in the pectin and watch the mixture carefully, stirring occasionally, to prevent from boiling over. When the temperature reaches 221 degrees F, 12 to15 minutes, remove from the heat and let cool slightly.

Pour the mixture into six 1/2-pint properly sterilized jars. Seal according to proper USDA canning procedures.

Jars should then be inverted to prevent the peppers from settling at the bottom. Cool completely before storing in the refrigerator. The jelly will continue to thicken as it cools.

Properly-handled sterilized equipment will keep canned foods in good condition for years. Sterilizing jars is the first step of preserving foods.

Tips:
Jars should be made from glass and free of any chips or cracks. Preserving or canning jars are topped with a glass, plastic, or metal lid, which has a rubber seal. Two piece lids are best for canning, as they vacuum seal when processed.

To sterilize jars, before filling with jams, pickles, or preserves, wash jars and lids with hot, soapy water. Rinse well and arrange jars and lids open sides up, without touching, on a tray. Boil the jars and lids in a large saucepan, covered with water, for 15 minutes.

Use tongs when handling the hot sterilized jars, to move them from boiling water. Be sure the tongs are sterilized too, by dipping the ends in boiling water for a few minutes.

As a rule, hot preserves go into hot jars and cold preserves go into cold jars. All items used in the process of making jams, jellies, and preserves must be clean. This includes any towels used, and especially your hands.

After the jars are sterilized, you can preserve the food. It is important to follow any canning and processing instructions included in the recipe and refer to USDA guidelines about the sterilization of canned products.

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4

Newest Ratings and Reviews

Read all 6 reviews

  • on June 22, 2014

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    This was a TERRIBLE recipe!!! I'm so mad right now. I have a great family recipe but couldn't find it so thought I'd just look one up- thinking, 'how bad can a recipe be with a few basic ingredients'. Well, this one took the bad award. Everything was wrong with it. No true measurements of peppers or pectin, it did not make ANYWHERE the amount indicated, cooking time was off... why tell people to use a thermometer?? Use boil time. As anyone knows making jelly/jam of any kind takes $, time and clean up can be messy due to sugar and pectin... all that for 3 little jars of runny stuff. ARGG!! You have had bad reviews on this recipe, take it OFF!!! Now I'm going to the Epicurious site for a good recipe.

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  • on December 21, 2013

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    I was so excited to make this, but it was a huge disappointment! First, it made less than 4 1/2 pint jars. I used 2 large red bell peppers and 4 large Fresno chilies. Second, it didn't set up like jelly at all. It was still VERY runny, even after cooling for a whole day! I will say that I did not use "half of a 9 oz package" as the instructions say. But I read the reviews and used 1/2 of a 1.75 oz package. Finally, this was way too vinegary! I used organic apple cider vinegar. I can't imagine putting this on anything, aside from maybe a roast pork. So much for homemade Christmas gifts...

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  • on October 14, 2012

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    Agree with the other reviewer re: the pectin measurement - just use half of the standard packet! Great sweet-savory jelly - I have served it as a corn pancake topping as well as a spread for baked brie and both were loved by guests. I saved the "red pepper water" from squeezing out the puree and used it as a base for a remix on Bloody Marys, too!

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