Rustic Thanksgiving Table

A fresh white-, green- and neutral-toned palette plus woodsy elements from the outdoors provide a warm backdrop for a family gathering.

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Photo By: Marshall Troy ©2012, Cooking Channel,LLC All Rights Reserved

Photo By: Marshall Troy ©2012, Cooking Channel,LLC All Rights Reserved

Photo By: Marshall Troy ©2012, Cooking Channel,LLC All Rights Reserved

Photo By: Marshall Troy ©2012, Cooking Channel,LLC All Rights Reserved

Photo By: Marshall Troy ©2012, Cooking Channel,LLC All Rights Reserved

Photo By: Marshall Troy ©2012, Cooking Channel,LLC All Rights Reserved

Photo By: Marshall Troy ©2012, Cooking Channel,LLC All Rights Reserved

Photo By: Marshall Troy ©2012, Cooking Channel,LLC All Rights Reserved

Photo By: Marshall Troy ©2012, Cooking Channel,LLC All Rights Reserved

Photo By: Marshall Troy ©2012, Cooking Channel,LLC All Rights Reserved

Twisted Picture

Tired of same-old red, yellow and orange hues at your Thanksgiving table? Buck tradition for a clean, fresh green-, white- and neutral-toned palette that speaks to the holiday's harvest-celebrating, nature-loving roots.

Very Visual

With its subdued colors, this table is all about texture: the fuzzy fronds of dusty miller, spindly sprigs of millet and tight clusters of boxwood leaves, combined with naturally flaking birch discs and pointy pinecones. Add even more interest by creating bouquets of different sizes and elevating them in vessels of varying height.

Simple Backdrop

At the foundation of this look is a simple wooden table (if yours isn't this neutral, lay a low-key linen in the white, brown or green color family). Any white plates will do — from crisp white china to earthy stoneware — and choose unadorned stemware to keep the clean aesthetic and add height to the table. A darker napkin in the same color family as the table (or your tablecloth) creates contrast, and when tucked into two strands of twine and velvet ribbon, looks finished and elegant.

A Seat Worth Saving

Miniature potted boxwood welcome guests to their seats, with names jotted on paper luggage tags and tied with twine. You can find the tiny plants at any craft or garden supply store and the tags at an office supply or paper-goods store. When the evening is over, guests can take the plants with them; they're perfect for brightening a desk or for perching on a windowsill.

Shape Up

In addition to texture, this table features a medley of shapes: a mix of round and square vases, round birch discs alongside narrow logs, and flowers and foliage that range from tight hydrangea to flowing scented geranium and prickly tufts of wild wheats. Place some of the vases on birch discs to create staggering heights.

Pitcher Perfect

Short on vases? No problem: Fill any old pitcher with flowers and it instantly becomes a centerpiece. We bordered ours with small, textured white vases that fit into the clean color scheme.

Back to Nature

Bring the outdoors in with birch discs and logs and pinecones. Scour your backyard for any wooden gems, or find the birch materials at any craft or garden supply store (they're sold in packs).

Cool Runner

No need to invest in a runner when you have woven placemats in a neutral tone. Line them down the center of the table to create a more formal look, staggering the birch and flowers on top. Bonus: They're super easy to wipe down and clean off when the meal is over.

Go Wild

Wild wheats and even herbs (here, oregano) add tremendous texture to floral arrangements and bulk them up at minimal cost.

Rustic Table Centerpiece

To make your own rustic centerpieces, you'll need the following flowers and foliage. (Feel free to pick and choose from this list, or sub in different white and green varieties.) Tie arrangements with floral tape to keep them in the shape you prefer and cut stems on an angle before putting them into water. Since white flowers tend to be very delicate, the roses and then the hydrangea will be the first to start dying, so to lengthen the life of your arrangement, remove these flowers after a couple days. The foliage and wheats that remain should last for up to a week!

Design and Styling by Lisa Fireman Dorhout, Studio Sweet Pea.

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