Evolution of the Smoothie

By: Lauren Miyashiro

The smoothie is getting a makeover and ditching the straw in favor of the spoon.

Smoothies are best known as "good morning" boosters and post-workout beverages. They’re fun to sip and can be both sweet and nutritious. But the concept of eating a bowl of smoothie for lunch or dinner is a whole new concept to me.

People are now sitting down to feast on “smoothie bowls,” introduced by Robeks Premium Fruit Smoothies. Bloggers have been on top of this trend for a few years now and embraced the concept, referring to the meal as SIAB (Smoothie in a Bowl). But until Robeks, smoothies haven’t been a reason to dine out.  The chain store thickened their recipe, added toppings and threw a spoon into the mix. And people are loving it.

It’s a hard trend to knock. All-natural, smoothies are lower in calories than most fast food options. And healthy is cool these days. From couscous to quinoa, food trends are tending towards the healthy. Has smoothie enlightenment been attained? Is the power all in the spoon?

Craving a smoothie now? Try Giada's Raspberry-Vanilla Smoothie or Ellie's healthy Peach Pie Smoothie. Turn it into a SIAB by pouring it into a bowl and sprinkling with granola.

We want to know: Are smoothies in a bowl the next big thing? Or are you going to be craving a burger an hour later?

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