Traditional Lunar New Year Dishes and Their Significance

By: Cooking Channel

The Chinese Lunar New Year is February 19. For Cooking Channel's Luke Nguyen, that means cooking fantastic food with his family, everyone wearing red, and wishing for prosperity and luck. In this web-only video, Luke shows you what he cooked with his family to celebrate last year and why:

[SNAP path="videos/lukes-family-new-year-part-1" vid="0205890"]
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