Dilly Pickled Beans

In preserving, as with most things, it's all about the right tool for the job. To the untrained eye, one Mason jar may look more or less like another, and while it's true they all get the job done, each has its strengths. There are two jars that have particular use: the Ball 12-oz. quilted jars and 24-oz. pint-and-a-half jars. Each of these is larger than their standard counterparts (half pint and pint, respectively), and each has a straight, cylindrical profile. This, then, makes them perfect for canning long, narrow things, like asparagus -- and green beans. They're an excellent project for the newbie preserver. It's as simple as packing the product into the jar, bringing a vinegar brine to a boil, and pouring same brine into the jar. They can be processed if you want them to be shelf-stable, but even if you just refrigerate them they'll keep for weeks. As if they'll last that long.
  • Level: Intermediate
  • Total: 1 hr 5 min
  • Prep: 20 min
  • Inactive: 30 min
  • Cook: 15 min
  • Yield: About 6 servings
Share This Recipe

Ingredients

1 pound green beans

2 cloves garlic, peeled

1 tablespoon red pepper flakes, or 1 serrano pepper, sliced

3 teaspoons dill seed, or several sprigs fresh dill weed

1 cup white vinegar

1/2 cup white wine vinegar

1/2 cup water

3 tablespoons pickling or canning salt

Directions

  1. Wash the green beans and trim their ends so that they are uniform. If needed, cut them further so that they will fit easily inside of the jars you are using to can them.
  2. Divide the beans into sterilized canning jars, along with the garlic, pepper flakes and dill seed. In a small saucepan, bring the vinegars, water and pickling salt to a boil, until the salt dissolves.
  3. Pour the pickling mixture over the green beans and cap the jars.
  4. Process the jars in a boiling water bath for 10 minutes. Alternatively, allow to cool and refrigerate.
  5. Properly-handled sterilized equipment will keep canned foods in good condition for years. Sterilizing jars is the first step of preserving foods.

Cook’s Note

When you fill your jars, really pack these beans in. Even if you think you can't cram one more in, try it; you'll be surprised how many you can fit in, and it will help them keep from floating in the jar. Also, be sure not to use iodized salt, like table salt. It will discolor your pickles over time. Jars should be made from glass and free of any chips or cracks. Preserving or canning jars are topped with a glass, plastic, or metal lid, which has a rubber seal. Two piece lids are best for canning, as they vacuum seal when processed.

Fudge Factor

The Craziest Chocolate Creations for American Chocolate Week Mar 17, 2013

It’s officially American Chocolate Week. Check out photos of mind-blowing chocolate creations.

Review: Anthony Bourdain and Eric Ripert's Chocolate Bar Nov 16, 2012

Anthony Bourdain and Eric Ripert have teamed up with master chocolatier Christopher Curtin to create the "Good & Evil" chocolate b …

Train Frontman Pat Monahan's Dark Chocolate Obsession Feb 11, 2013

By: Cameron Curtis

Train frontman Pat Monahan, an avid chocolate lover, shared with us his top five reasons for eating dark chocolate.

Sifted: Plan-Ahead Valentine's Day Desserts Feb 6, 2013

By: Lauren Miyashiro

Get our take on the best in food news, recipes and more from around the web, including the best Valentine's Day recipes.

Over-the-Top-Delicious Treats to Satisfy Your Food Obsession

Are you infatuated with ice cream? Do you lust over lobster? Swoon at the sight of chocolate? Here's the best recipe for each food …

Chocolate Desserts

Indulge in our decadent chocolate desserts, from cookies and cakes to puddings, souffles and truffles.

How to Chop and Melt Chocolate

Lots of recipes call for melted chocolate. Follow these step-by-step instructions to do it properly.